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Biodiversity: How Do Greenhouses Help Global Warming

Global warming has been a heated topic of discussion around the world for a long time now. Earth’s climate has altered throughout history, and most of these climate changes are accredited to very small shifts in Earth’s orbit that vary the amount of solar energy our planet gets.

Since 1880, the combined land and ocean temperature has increased at an average rate of 0.13°F (0.08°C) per decade, according to NOAA's 2020 Annual Climate Report. However, since 1981, the average rate of increase (0.18°C / 0.32°F) has been more than twice that rate.

Some of the common factors that contribute to global warming include industrial pollution as well as things in our daily life such as smoke from our cars and plastic wastage.

In this article, we’ll take a look at how global warming impacts biodiversity, and how it can be reduced by building greenhouses.

What is Global Warming?

Since the Industrial Revolution, the worldwide yearly temperature has risen by a little more than 1°C, or about 2°F. Between 1880 and 1980, it increased on average by 0.07°C (0.13°F) every decade. However, the rate of increase has more than doubled since 1981.

The outcome? A planet that has never been hotter. Since 2005, we’ve seen 9 of the 10 warmest years since 1880, and the 5 warmest years on record have all happened since 2015.

According to climate scientists, we must limit global warming to 1.5°C by 2040 if we’re to avoid a future in which daily life across the globe is marked by its worst, most shocking impacts –the extreme famines, wildfires, tropical storms, floods, and other catastrophes.

These impacts are experienced by all individuals in one way or another but are felt most intensely by the disadvantaged and the financially sidelined, for whom climate change is often a main driver of scarcity, dislodgment, starvation, and social turbulence.

How Global Warming Affects Biodiversity

Extinction, migration, contraction, or expansion, there are countless ways global warming can impact biodiversity. For example, the shifts in the environment can cause hurdles in the availability of food for many species. To sustain themselves, those species would migrate to another region depending on their needs.

To get a little more specific, pollinators such as bees and butterflies need flowers to feed themselves as well as benefit the environment by pollinating them. However, if there are no plants or flowers left in their natural habitat due to global warming, they would have to move to another region. Once the pollinators abandon that area, other animals dependent on the fruits, vegetables, or even leaves from plants would be deprived of food.

A little change can start such a huge chain reaction. Many species would successfully find a new habitat while others would face challenges like predators, change in environment, temperature and terrain, and food as well. The species unable to find a new habitat will slowly go extinct if not preserved.

The example was just for the bees and butterflies but almost every species has been suffering from such situations for the past few years. A lot of species have gone extinct and it has even added up to the overall global warming as well.

We, humans, are not being helpful in such situations either. We’re cutting down trees for wood, converting potential migration corridors; destroying them, and fragmenting them. We are polluting the oceans by disposing of plastic and harmful wastage in them as well. For the sake of industrial and technological advancement, many big organizations are hurting the environment for inevitable consequences.

The balance in biodiversity has been highly affected by global warming and there is not much anyone can do except preserving what we have. The best way to fight global warming, or at least slow it down, is by building greenhouses.

Greenhouses: What are Those & How They Can Help

A greenhouse (also known as a glasshouse) is a structure with walls and roof made primarily of transparent material, like glass, in which plants needing controlled climatic conditions are grown. These structures vary in size from small cabins to industrial-sized buildings. The interior of a greenhouse exposed to sunlight becomes considerably warmer than the exterior temperature, guarding the plants inside in cold weather.

Greenhouses are inexpensive, sustainable, and eco-friendly. They produce less wastage, use less energy, and help you minimize your energy bills as well while benefiting the environment. Mostly, recycled and sustainable material is used to build greenhouses. It means that just building greenhouses is beneficial to the environment before we even consider the benefits of it once it is finished.

Many commercial greenhouses are high-tech production facilities for vegetables, flowers, or fruits. They are packed with equipment including screening installations, cooling, heating, lighting, and may be controlled by a computer to enhance conditions for plant growth.

Source: Build Review

How Greenhouses Help Fight Global Warming

As discussed already, greenhouses use less energy, which makes a lot of difference. That is because, with energy consumption, there are huge carbon footprints as well as a lot of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere of the Earth. This later adds up to the notorious greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Many greenhouse models that are totally dependent on geothermal, solar, or wind technologies to produce energy have no carbon emissions. Therefore, they are totally eco-friendly and contribute to the environment. Typically, none of the natural habitats or landscapes are damaged when building a greenhouse.

In addition to that, since greenhouses use sustainable and recycled material for building, it is never gone to waste. Even after a greenhouse has been demolished, the material can be used again and again to build another greenhouse.

Moreover, greenhouses are extremely helpful when it comes to protecting your plants from animals, insects, and extreme weather. With shelter inside an enclosed structure, pests and predators such as moles, deer, and birds won’t be able to eat or attack plants. This also decreases the need for toxic pesticides or chemicals that defend against unwanted insects.

Simply put, lowering the carbon emissions as well as reducing toxic waste is how greenhouses help fight global warming and support biodiversity as well.

Key Takeaway

To stop climate change and global warming, we need to stop the amount of greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide, from increasing. This is where building greenhouses can help as they use less energy and reduce environmental waste.

If you’re supporting biodiversity and want to help stop global warming purchase fruits and vegetables from farms that grow their crops in greenhouses. Support fight against global warming, support local farmers that uses indoor farming in UAE. They not only produces fresh, natural crops but also helps fight against global warming, visit our website or reach out to us through our email [email protected]. We’ll be happy to help.

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Wafra Farm Trading

Play Video

Biodiversity: How Do Greenhouses Help Global Warming

Global warming has been a heated topic of discussion around the world for a long time now. Earth’s climate has altered throughout history, and most of these climate changes are accredited to very small shifts in Earth’s orbit that vary the amount of solar energy our planet gets.

Since 1880, the combined land and ocean temperature has increased at an average rate of 0.13°F (0.08°C) per decade, according to NOAA's 2020 Annual Climate Report. However, since 1981, the average rate of increase (0.18°C / 0.32°F) has been more than twice that rate.

Some of the common factors that contribute to global warming include industrial pollution as well as things in our daily life such as smoke from our cars and plastic wastage.

In this article, we’ll take a look at how global warming impacts biodiversity, and how it can be reduced by building greenhouses.

What is Global Warming?

Since the Industrial Revolution, the worldwide yearly temperature has risen by a little more than 1°C, or about 2°F. Between 1880 and 1980, it increased on average by 0.07°C (0.13°F) every decade. However, the rate of increase has more than doubled since 1981.

The outcome? A planet that has never been hotter. Since 2005, we’ve seen 9 of the 10 warmest years since 1880, and the 5 warmest years on record have all happened since 2015.

According to climate scientists, we must limit global warming to 1.5°C by 2040 if we’re to avoid a future in which daily life across the globe is marked by its worst, most shocking impacts –the extreme famines, wildfires, tropical storms, floods, and other catastrophes.

These impacts are experienced by all individuals in one way or another but are felt most intensely by the disadvantaged and the financially sidelined, for whom climate change is often a main driver of scarcity, dislodgment, starvation, and social turbulence.

How Global Warming Affects Biodiversity

Extinction, migration, contraction, or expansion, there are countless ways global warming can impact biodiversity. For example, the shifts in the environment can cause hurdles in the availability of food for many species. To sustain themselves, those species would migrate to another region depending on their needs.

To get a little more specific, pollinators such as bees and butterflies need flowers to feed themselves as well as benefit the environment by pollinating them. However, if there are no plants or flowers left in their natural habitat due to global warming, they would have to move to another region. Once the pollinators abandon that area, other animals dependent on the fruits, vegetables, or even leaves from plants would be deprived of food.

A little change can start such a huge chain reaction. Many species would successfully find a new habitat while others would face challenges like predators, change in environment, temperature and terrain, and food as well. The species unable to find a new habitat will slowly go extinct if not preserved.

The example was just for the bees and butterflies but almost every species has been suffering from such situations for the past few years. A lot of species have gone extinct and it has even added up to the overall global warming as well.

We, humans, are not being helpful in such situations either. We’re cutting down trees for wood, converting potential migration corridors; destroying them, and fragmenting them. We are polluting the oceans by disposing of plastic and harmful wastage in them as well. For the sake of industrial and technological advancement, many big organizations are hurting the environment for inevitable consequences.

The balance in biodiversity has been highly affected by global warming and there is not much anyone can do except preserving what we have. The best way to fight global warming, or at least slow it down, is by building greenhouses.

Greenhouses: What are Those & How They Can Help

A greenhouse (also known as a glasshouse) is a structure with walls and roof made primarily of transparent material, like glass, in which plants needing controlled climatic conditions are grown. These structures vary in size from small cabins to industrial-sized buildings. The interior of a greenhouse exposed to sunlight becomes considerably warmer than the exterior temperature, guarding the plants inside in cold weather.

Greenhouses are inexpensive, sustainable, and eco-friendly. They produce less wastage, use less energy, and help you minimize your energy bills as well while benefiting the environment. Mostly, recycled and sustainable material is used to build greenhouses. It means that just building greenhouses is beneficial to the environment before we even consider the benefits of it once it is finished.

Many commercial greenhouses are high-tech production facilities for vegetables, flowers, or fruits. They are packed with equipment including screening installations, cooling, heating, lighting, and may be controlled by a computer to enhance conditions for plant growth.

Source: Build Review

How Greenhouses Help Fight Global Warming

As discussed already, greenhouses use less energy, which makes a lot of difference. That is because, with energy consumption, there are huge carbon footprints as well as a lot of carbon dioxide released into the atmosphere of the Earth. This later adds up to the notorious greenhouse gases in the atmosphere.

Many greenhouse models that are totally dependent on geothermal, solar, or wind technologies to produce energy have no carbon emissions. Therefore, they are totally eco-friendly and contribute to the environment. Typically, none of the natural habitats or landscapes are damaged when building a greenhouse.

In addition to that, since greenhouses use sustainable and recycled material for building, it is never gone to waste. Even after a greenhouse has been demolished, the material can be used again and again to build another greenhouse.

Moreover, greenhouses are extremely helpful when it comes to protecting your plants from animals, insects, and extreme weather. With shelter inside an enclosed structure, pests and predators such as moles, deer, and birds won’t be able to eat or attack plants. This also decreases the need for toxic pesticides or chemicals that defend against unwanted insects.

Simply put, lowering the carbon emissions as well as reducing toxic waste is how greenhouses help fight global warming and support biodiversity as well.

Key Takeaway

To stop climate change and global warming, we need to stop the amount of greenhouse gases, like carbon dioxide, from increasing. This is where building greenhouses can help as they use less energy and reduce environmental waste.

If you’re supporting biodiversity and want to help stop global warming purchase fruits and vegetables from farms that grow their crops in greenhouses. Support fight against global warming, support local farmers that uses indoor farming in UAE. They not only produces fresh, natural crops but also helps fight against global warming, visit our website or reach out to us through our email [email protected]. We’ll be happy to help.

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